• Solo • Unboxing Dyrgen(tm) Masterwork Crossbow

Self explanatory

Once an isolated and dying township, an influx of academics, adventurers and thrill seekers have made Scalvoris Town their home. From scholars' tea shops to a new satellite campus for Viden Academy, this is an exciting place to visit or make your home!

Moderators: Pegasus Pug!!!, Avalon

User avatar
Oram Mednix
Approved Character
Posts: 948
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:59 am
Race: Human
Profession: Ranger-in-Chief
Renown: 960
Character Sheet
Character Wiki
Letters
Point Bank Thread
Wealth Tier: Tier 10

Featured

Contribution

Milestones

RP Medals

Miscellaneous

Events

Unboxing Dyrgen(tm) Masterwork Crossbow

17 Ashan 721

Oram set down his magic glasses with an emphatic *clink* and then leaned back, letting out a long, relieved, weary sigh. He had just finished composing his very first letter, or at least the first one of any importance, addressed to the Alberach. Hopefully, she would not find it as much of a task to read it as it had been for Oram to write it. He was massaging his right hand while waiting for the ink to dry on his signature when he saw the silhouette moving along the outside wall of his tent.

Intrigued, the hunter watched as the form rounded the corner, and he realized that it was coming towards the entrance, which he turned around to face and wait. A tall, large-boned townie woman appeared in the doorway. Oram had seen her around before; she was a messenger. Someone had a message for him? He wondered for a moment if she might take his letter for him to the Council Hall, as well.

”Mr. Mednix?” she said as she pantomimed knocking on the canvas of the tent as if it were a door. ”I have a message for you from a Master Dyrgen.”

Oram’s heart raced in anticipation on hearing the name; he had a good idea what the message concerned. ”What’s the message?” he asked.

The woman looked at a paper she held and cleared her throat. Then she read: ”Mr. Dyrgen sends his greetings and regards and hopes these presents find you well. This is to notify you that the crossbow you ordered is now ready for delivery with all its attendant accessories. Mr. Dyrgen hopes that you will find these items satisfactory. He wishes to inquire whether you wish him to hold these items for pick-up or to have them delivered. If the latter, he requests that you return this message with delivery instructions, as well as a preferred time.” She looked up at the traveler expectantly.

Oram glanced back at his own letter and quickly made up his mind. ”Tell Mr. Dyrgen I plan to pick up the crossbow myself. I will do so today, sometime after mid-trial, hopefully not long after.” The messenger nodded.

”Do you wish me to send Master Dyrgen your regards, sir?” she asked.

Oram smirked and waved his hand dismissively. ”Of course. Regards, compliments, greetings, whatever the right pleasantries are. I know Dyrgen. I’ll be seeing him soon and we’ll chat plenty when I get there, I’m sure.”

The messenger was clearly well-trained to observe formalities herself without insisting on them from others. She nodded with understanding and took her leave.
Last edited by Oram Mednix on Thu Apr 15, 2021 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total. word count: 446
Villains are powerless against story beats.
User avatar
Oram Mednix
Approved Character
Posts: 948
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:59 am
Race: Human
Profession: Ranger-in-Chief
Renown: 960
Character Sheet
Character Wiki
Letters
Point Bank Thread
Wealth Tier: Tier 10

Featured

Contribution

Milestones

RP Medals

Miscellaneous

Events

Re: Unboxing Dyrgen(tm) Masterwork Crossbow

Caught with his hand on the tiller

It was Ornot’s turn to pull the wagon today. Oram seemed to have finally found something his more difficult pack goat wouldn’t complain about; Ornot actually seemed to enjoy pulling the toy wagon through the Scalvoris streets, if anything more than Wether did. Ornot wittered merrily as they rattled the empty re-purposed toy wagon over cobblestones towards the Council Hall where Oram delivered his sealed letter to the clerk, to be delivered from there to the care of the Proper, and thence, hopefully, to Albarech Kura. From there, they went to the blacksmith’s.

Dyrgen beamed when Oram entered, and asked Osric to watch the shop while he showed the traveler his latest creation. Oram scarcely had time to exchange greetings with his brother before the burly smith clapped an arm about his shoulders and drew him bodily to the back of the shop.

The bow hung on the back door to the shop; with light slanting onto it from a nearby window, the weapon displayed in a way that would have made Dyrgen’s prize items out front on the shop floor envious. Dyrgen walked Oram to within three paces of where the crossbow hung and then released his grip on the smaller huntsman’s shoulders, standing aside to let him admire it. The smith clearly -and from what Oram could tell, rightfully- took pride in this piece.

Dyrgen took a step forward to stand next to it, and began describing the parts as he pointed them out with big, meaty fingers that belied the nimbleness they must have had to fashion such a weapon. ”As you can see, the crossbow has a hanging loop in the very front. Makes it easy to carry or mount, whether on a wall, or on your Mule, or even your own belt loop. It’s steel, and , like all the exposed metal bits, is blacked so that no glint will give you away. The actual crossbow bit is called the ‘prong’. That’s the string of course. And the body is called the ‘tiller’ or sometimes the ‘stock’.”

The smith lifted the crossbow down from the hook on the door and held it closer, so that Oram could see it more clearly in the sunlight from the window. As he did, the hunter saw that it was covered with light and dark patterning. Even the front of the prong had some kind of pattern on it. Was it painted?

”The prong is made of steel,” the smith said, as if reading Oram’s thoughts. ”It’s covered and backed in patterned linen. The bowstring is linen, too, as is some of the other cordage. Other bits are silk.” The patterns looked like vaguely-shaped dark leaves against a lighter background. The dark areas were black or dark green, the lighter areas ranged from light green to tan to dun. The patterning continued along the top and sides of the tiller.

”Tiller itself is made from rosewood, covered with bone and horn. Rosewood is dense and thus heavy, here.” Dyrgen at last handed Oram’s bow to him. The hunter’s arms sagged for a trill until he adjusted to the crossbow’s heft. Dyrgen grinned knowingly when he saw this. ”More massive than it looks, eh?”

Oram looked at the crossbow with wondering admiration. The bow was certainly heavier than his flatbow, but that hardly preoccupied him at the moment. ”All this patterning work,” he muttered. ”It’s perfect for breaking up outlines, isn’t it? How did you think to do that?”

Dyrgen’s knowing grin widened and grew even more knowledgeable. ”Been at this an arc or two. You’re not the first hunter I’ve made quality items for.”

Oram’s thoughts went unwittingly to Groom Peavers, then quickly snapped away from him, back to the present. He ran his finger along the front top portion of the tiller, just behind the span of the bowstring, where for a little farther than the length of his hand the deck of the tiller dipped about half a finger’s thickness -his finger, not Dyrgen’s. ”Why is this cut out like this?” he asked.

Dyrgen pointed at the bowstring. ”Keeps the string free from friction once it’s let loose.” He pointed to a small, notched metal cylinder mounted sideways in the tiller. ”That’s the nut. Part of the trigger mechanism. I’ll show you more about that when we go outside to shoot the thing. And speaking of…” The smith pantomimed for Oram to turn the weapon belly-up. When he did, he saw a piece of metal that bent to run lengthwise towards the back of the tiller. ”That’s the trigger,” Dyrgen explained.

Oram turned the weapon deck-up again and noticed two small bits of dark metal sticking out the sides, about half-way up the tiller. ”What are those?” he asked.

Dyrgen didn’t answer right away; instead, he went back to the door where the crossbow had hung and retrieved another item that hung there, which Oram hadn’t noticed before. It was a dark metal thing that reminded him somewhat of a bit and bridle. The smith rattled it so that it chinked slightly. ”This is a gaffe,” he explained. ”It’s what you use to pull back the bowstring. And those things on the tiller are the lugs you hold the gaffe against to do so.”

Oram rotated the crossbow curiously. ”So I don’t need to…” he pantomimed turning a crank.

Dyrgen chuckled. ”A crannequin? No, Immortals forfend, no! You’ll find the goat’s foot gaffe much simpler to use. Speaking of which, how about we step outside and I’ll show you how to put this crossbow to work.”
word count: 971
Villains are powerless against story beats.
User avatar
Oram Mednix
Approved Character
Posts: 948
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:59 am
Race: Human
Profession: Ranger-in-Chief
Renown: 960
Character Sheet
Character Wiki
Letters
Point Bank Thread
Wealth Tier: Tier 10

Featured

Contribution

Milestones

RP Medals

Miscellaneous

Events

Re: Unboxing Dyrgen(tm) Masterwork Crossbow

The snooty end is the shooty end.

Dyrgen opened the back door to his shop, admitting a shaft of bright sunlight and breath of chilly, fresh air, and gestured Oram to go ahead. The hunter blinked as he exited into a narrow fenced-in yard that adjoined an alley. Behind him he heard the smith follow him out, accompanied by a faint rattling sound, and then the sound of the back door shutting. Oram turned to see Dyrgen with a leather bag that he thought looked too small to be a quiver. Nonetheless, the mouth of the bag bristled with short, thick wooden shafts each fletched with a single, opposed pair of vanes.

The smith grinned at the traveler’s puzzled look. ”These are your new ammunition: quarrels or bolts,” he said, shaking the quiver. ”The shafts are slightly thicker, but also a good deal shorter than you’re probably used to, even with a shorter bow. And you’ll find you can carry a lot more ammunition for it as a result.” Dyrgen set the quiver down and, after a few trills of rummaging, extracted a bolt that ended in a blunt tip and offered it to Oram.

”If you’ll switch,” offered the smith, ”I’ll demonstrate loading and firing the weapon.” Oram handed Dyrgen the crossbow and took the bolt in hand. Its vanes, he noticed, were wood rather than feather. Before he had a chance to ask why, Dyrgen was already raising the gaffe to the weapon. ”The draw on a crossbow is *very* heavy, so you’re not going to want to try drawing it with your fingers. You’ll need the gaffe for leverage.”

The two “toes” of the goat’s foot lay atop the lugs on either side of the tiller. Then the gaffe leaned forward until the retracting hooks fit over the bowstring. Once that was done, Dyrgen gripped the lever/handle part and pulled back. The bowstring hit some knobs on the little cylindrical nut and rotated it back until it locked. That made noise, ending in an audible click, more than a bow would being drawn. ”When you hear that ‘click’” Dyrgen explained, ”it means the trigger mechanism has locked. You might have noticed that the trigger itself moved slightly, too.”

In truth, Oram had not, but he noted the trigger now. This was a long, thin metal piece that protruded out from beneath the tiller and then bent backwards to form a lever handle, just longer than Dyrgen’s large hand was wide. The smith gripped the belly of the tiller in one hand and waved it slowly about. ”Once you’ve got the bowstring locked into place, the crossbow will stay drawn until you fire it. You could set it down like this on your mantelpiece overnight and it would still be drawn in the morning. I don’t recommend that, though, as the bowstring will slacken over time.” Dyrgen hooked the gaffe onto his belt, then held his free hand out. ”Give me the bolt, and I’ll show you how it fires.”

Oram handed over the bolt. ”You draw it empty like that?” he asked, nodding towards bow, ”…and put the bolt in after?”

Dyrgen grunted assent as he laid the quarrel carefully along the tiller’s deck, then slid the shaft back so that the nock fit over the string. ”Safer that way,” he answered then. With the bolt fitted onto the string, Dyrgen again held the crossbow out with just one hand. ”And once more, you *could* leave this on your mantelpiece overnight and shoot it in the morning, but I *really* wouldn’t recommend that.”

He raised the bow into a firing position and pointed it towards a compost pile heaped against the fence about ten paces away. ”And when you do want to fire, it’s easy, just put your hand over the trigger, and pull.” With a click the flexed prong straightened and the bowstring snapped forward. The bolt was gone in the blink of an eye. Oram looked over to see the shaft protruding from the compost pile. Dyrgen pushed the weapon towards him, along with the gaffe. ”Now you try it,” he suggested. ”Go ahead and load it while I get the bolt.”

Dyrgen waited a moment to do that to ensure that Oram first remembered to rotate the nut forward so the little knobs on it would be set to catch the bowstring as it was drawn back. It took Oram a couple tries to get the goat’s foot oriented the right way, but once he did, the mechanism was quite intuitive. He laid the gaffe atop the lugs and then leaned it forward to hook the other end onto the bowstring. It took a little effort, but not much, to pull the lever back until the nut locked into place. Fumbling with the gaffe to put it away with one hand proved to be the trickiest part of the process. By the time he was done, Dyrgen was back with the bolt in hand, cleaning off the blunt head with the oilstained rag that hung ever from his apron. He handed it to Oram and watched the hunter place the quarrel.

”Before you fire it,” the smith interjected, ”I want to show you one more thing: the bolt clip.” This, it turned out, was an attachment on the deck that could be rotated forward to clip onto the back of the quarrel once it was loaded. ”This will hold the bolt in place, keep it from sliding around once you’ve loaded the weapon. It’s not a safety; it won’t keep the bolt from shooting if you pull the trigger, but it will affect the accuracy and range a lot.” The smith stepped back to give Oram room. ”I personally don’t recommend using it. It’s too easy to forget it’s on in the heat of the moment. But other of my customers have liked it, so I figure I should put it on yours as well, in case you decide you like it.”

Oram looked curiously at the thing, but felt no urge to try it just then. He was more anxious to try out shooting. He raised the weapon to his eye and took aim at the compost heap. The crossbow was heavier to hold up than a regular bow, but at least one didn’t have to keep the string drawn by hand. Not sure what to expect, he placed his fingers over the trigger and pulled. Instinctively, he pulled the way he would on a bowstring. This had the effect of pulling up and back slightly on the rear of the weapon, and his blunt landed at the very base of the compost heap.

”Just squeeze with your hand,” Dyrgen suggested. ”You don’t have to pull the trigger up with your arm like you would a bowstring.”

Oram went to get the blunt, cleaned it off, and tried loading and firing it again. The gaffe added a step, and an additional object to hold. It took the hunter a bit of juggling to finish the process and get the gaffe put away. Dyrgen chuckled as he watched. ”Takes some getting used to, eh?” he observed.

With just the barest nod of acknowledgement, Oram raised the crossbow once more, took aim, and fired at the compost heap, squeezing the trigger with just his hand. This time the bolt struck close to dead center of the compost heap. The weapon kicked just slightly, but apart from that, there was barely any reaction to firing. The feedback that came with releasing a bowstring’s tension wasn’t there. Glancing down at the crossbow, Oram agreed: ”Yes, this will take some getting used to, but I think it’ll be fun.”
word count: 1310
Villains are powerless against story beats.
User avatar
Doran
Peer Reviewer
Peer Reviewer
Posts: 3564
Joined: Sat Sep 03, 2016 3:43 am
Race: Mortal Born
Profession: Alchemist
Renown: 1162
Character Sheet
Character Wiki
Plot Notes
Templates
Letters
Point Bank Thread
Wealth Tier: Tier 10

Re: Unboxing Dyrgen(tm) Masterwork Crossbow

Image
Oram:

Knowledge:
Combat:Ranged x 3
Design x 1
Engineering x 1
Smithing x 1

Loot: -
Lost: -
Wealth: -
Injuries: -
Renown: -
Magic XP: -
Skill Review: Appropriate to level.
Points: 10
- - -
Comments: This was another enjoyable Oram thread. The contrast because Mr. Dyrgen’s messenger and Oram was obvious and amusing to read on top of it. I loved how Oram said “regards, compliments, greetings, whatever the right pleasantries are.” I checked your CS because I was curious if Oram actually had the Etiquette skill. I have to say, you play someone with one point in Etiquette well!

I’m a bit of a fan of Oram’s goats, I have to admit, and I like that Ornot pulls an actual toy wagon. I wonder what people think when they see Oram with his goats and his toy wagon though. That’s something I would like to read about in a thread of yours sometime!

Unless there already is such a thread, and I’ve overlooked it and forgotten all about it?

The way you made Dyrgen describe the crossbow makes it sound amazing. I appreciate in how much detail it was described – and that you actually included a short impromptu crossbow practice session. I think I actually learned something about crossbows from it.

That being said, I look forward to reading more threads about Oram and his new crossbow!

Enjoy your rewards!

P.S.: I might have added “Etiquette” to the list of skills used. Etiquette – or a lack thereof – played a part in the first post!
word count: 256

Mutations

N/A

Blessings

N/A

Worn Items

Ring of Reversal
Ring of Immunity
Post Reply Request an XP Review Claim Wealth Thread

Return to “Scalvoris Town”