Subjective

This section is for players to post about things unrelated to the Standing Trials roleplay. You may talk about anything from world issues, to your personal life, to funny things you found on the internet. You are free to use this forum to express yourself as a player and not as your actual character. You can also post in other players journals so long as they give you permission to. Please remember not to post anything relating to pornography or anything with extensive use of profanity.
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Malcolm
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Thu Apr 13, 2017 12:32 am

Alright vs. All Right
The form alright is a one-word spelling of the phrase all right. Alright is commonly used in written dialogue and informal writing, but all right is the only acceptable form in edited writing. Basically, it is not all right to use alright in place of all right in standard English.
Last edited by Malcolm on Fri Apr 14, 2017 8:11 pm, edited 1 time in total. word count: 64
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Malcolm
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Fri Apr 14, 2017 8:10 pm

"Your welcome."
"Tha-- wait, my what is welcome?"
You're vs Your
The confusion between your and you’re occurs because the two words are pronounced pretty much the same.

The ironclad rule – no exceptions – is that if you’re able to replace the word with "you are," you’re saying you’re. Otherwise, your only choice is your.

You're welcome.
word count: 71
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Malcolm
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Sat Apr 15, 2017 10:51 pm

The error was too glaring to ignore.
To vs Too
To is a preposition with several meanings, including “toward” and “until.” Too is an adverb that can mean “excessively” or “also.”
word count: 40
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Malcolm
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Wed Apr 19, 2017 6:52 am

Their vs There
"Their" is the possessive form of the plural pronoun they, used as an adjective preceding a noun (e.g., their company, their books on the shelves, their promotion to upper management).

"There" has multiple functions and can be used as an adverb, noun, pronoun, adjective, or interjection (e.g., look over there, there is no peanut butter left, there must be something we can do about the giant snake in Woody's boot).
word count: 85
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Malcolm
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Wed Apr 19, 2017 9:59 pm

Breath vs Breathe
Breath is a noun and refers to the air that it inhaled or exhaling while breathing. Breathe is a verb and is the action of inhaling or exhaling.

Breath

Definition:
air that is taken in and expelled during breathing

Examples:
he took a deep breath and dived into the pool

Breathe

Definition:
draw air into, and expel out of, the lungs

Examples:
I can breathe better when the air is clean
word count: 83
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Malcolm
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Fri Apr 21, 2017 9:44 pm

Lose vs Loose
Lose is a verb that means “to fail to win, to misplace, or to free oneself from something or someone.” Loose is an adjective that means “not tight.”
word count: 40
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Malcolm
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Sun Apr 23, 2017 12:26 am

Taught vs Taut
Taught is the past tense of teach, to give instruction or impart knowledge. Related words are teaches and teaching. Taught is a transitive verb, which is a verb that takes an object. Taught comes from the Old English tahte, past tense of the Old English word taecan.

Taut is an adjective which means pulled tight, tense and strained, controlled. Related words are tautly, tautness. The verb form is tauten. Taut comes to us from the mid-thirteenth century tohte or Middle English toght, meaning stretched or pulled tight.
word count: 100
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Malcolm
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Mon Apr 24, 2017 9:29 am

Ware vs Wear
Ware comes from the Old English word waru meaning article of merchandise. Wear may be used as a noun or verb, related words are wears, wearing, wore and worn.
word count: 41
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Malcolm
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Tue Apr 25, 2017 9:29 am

Who's vs Whose
Who's is a contraction of who is or who has, and whose is a possessive pronoun.

Who’s this? [who is]
Who's in charge here? [who is]
She is a good student who's always been interested in math [who has]
Who’s got my keys? [who has]

Whose bag is it?
The gentleman whose cell phone was stolen was very upset.
My roommate, whose sister is an actress, gets lots of requests for autographs.
word count: 90
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Malcolm
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Mon May 29, 2017 9:45 am

Accept vs Except
To accept is to receive, and except is to exclude, usually.

Accept is a verb that means "to receive, admit, regard as true, say yes."

Except is a preposition that means "excluding."
Except is also a conjunction that means "if not for the fact that" or "other than."
Except is a fairly uncommon verb that means "to leave out, exclude."
The noun exception means "exclusion" or "one that is excepted."
word count: 82
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