Tei'serin's Plotnotes

The plot development forum is designed for players and groups to keep track of their plot lines, goals they wish their characters to complete in each season, and anything else that may tie into your character's past, present, and future. Please remember that this is not the Personal Journals forum and should not be treated as such. All information posted within this forum should be information that ties back to your character within the Standing Trials Roleplay.

Tei'serin's Plotnotes

Postby Tei'serin Nji'ryn » Thu Oct 13, 2016 2:18 am

Tattoos

Over the years, Tei'serin's guardian has given her many tattoos. He does it partly out of a need to claim her, and mark her as his. But he also does it as a form of control. In giving her the tattoo, he is altering her appearance at his whim; controlling what she looks like. The fact that it is a painful experience for her, and that she hates being marked by him in such a way only makes it that much more enjoyable to him. As does the fact that tattoos are part of the Sev'ryn culture, and he is twisting that part of her heritage to his own whims.


Appearance
Image

This is the tattoo on Tei'serin's right shoulder. It starts at the base of her neck, and stops shortly past the curve of her shoulder. It is the first tattoo her guardian gave her.

Image

This tattoo is located on Tei'serin's left calf.

Image

This tattoo was "earned" as a punishment when Tei'serin tried to run away when she was a child. The pain she endured in getting it was severe enough that she never tried to run away again. It has been added to over the arcs as she has aged, and grown.

Image

This tattoo is located on her right hip, and thigh.

Image

This one is located on her right foot.

Image

This one is located on her belly.

Image

This tattoo starts at the top of her left thigh, climbs up her left side, and twists around her body to cover her chest.

Image

This tattoo is on her left foot, and travels up her ankle.

Image

This tattoo is on her left shoulder.

Image

This tattoo is on both of her inner thighs.

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This is the first tattoo that Tei'serin ever got. It is located on the back of her left hand, the place she herself chose when she was a month old.

Image

This tattoo is located on her right wrist, and is wrapped around her wrist so that the green leaves form a bracelet.
User avatar
Tei'serin Nji'ryn
Approved Character
 
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2016 11:25 pm
Race: Sev'ryn
Profession: Herbalist and Teacher
Renown: +153
Character Sheet
Prophets' Notes
Plot Notes
Personal Journal
Templates
Medals: 14
Painting With Words (1) One Arc Later... (1) Pioneer (2) ...ow. (1)
First Kiss (1) Immortal Lover (1) Legend In Waiting (1) Vhalar 716 (1)
Holiday Event 2016 (1) Cylus 717 Thread Challenge (1) Cylus 717 PC/Dev Challenge (1) Cylus 717 All Star (1)
Event Medal (1)

Tei'serin's Plotnotes

Postby Tei'serin Nji'ryn » Mon Oct 24, 2016 11:23 am

Tei'serin Nji'ryn


Point Bank System



ItemDebitCredit
October Top Votes: at 300 votes ... 5
November Top Votes: at 250 votes ... 4
December Top Votes: at 250 votes ... 4
Finish Collaborative Thread with 2+ PCs ([Global Event] The Great Meeting) ... 5
Meet An Immortal or Mortal Born: Ufrek, Xiur, Illaren, Ethelynda, Ymiden, Yvithia, Vhalar, Qylios ... 16
Earned a medal (Vhalar 716) ... 5
Finish Collaborative Thread with 2+ PCs (here) ... 5
Earned a Medal (Holiday Event 2016) ... 5
Event Participation and Completion ([Global Event] The Great Meeting) ... 2
Event Participation and Completion (Holiday Event 2016) ... 2
January Top Votes: at 250 votes ... 4
February Top Votes: at 250 votes ... 4
Submit a Thoughtful Player Review on the Player Feedback Forum here ... 5
Finish Collaborative Thread with 2+ PCs (not including your PC) ... 5
Event Participation and Completion (here) ... 2
March Top Votes: at 300 votes ... 5
Create An Approved ST Holiday: (Greeting the Sun) ... 3
Create Approved ST Folklore The Lucky Seed ... 3
April Top Votes: at 200 votes ... 3
Event Participation and Completion ([Global Event] Battle To The Tomb of Treid) ... 2
Finish Collaborative Thread with 2+ PCs ([Global Event] Battle To The Tomb of Treid) ... 5
Event Participation and Completion (Cylus 717 Writing Challenge) ... 2
Event Participation and Completion (Cylus 717 PC/Dev Challenge) ... 2
Earned 3 medals (Cylus 717 Thread Challenge, Cylus 717 PC/Dev Challenge, and Cylus 717 All Star) ... 15
May Top Votes: at 150 votes ... 2
June Top Votes: at 200 votes ... 3
Create an Approved Location (here) ... 5
Create an Approved Location (here) ... 5
Create an Approved NPC (here) ... 2
Earned a medal (Pioneer) ... 5
July Top Votes: at 200 votes ... 3
Earned a medal (Immortal Lover) ... 5
August Top Votes: at 150 votes ... 2
Earned a medal (First Kiss) ... 5
Create an Approved Location (here) ... 5
Create 4 Approved NPCs (here) ... 8
Create an Approved NPC (here) ... 2
Earned a medal (Legend in Waiting) ... 5
Reach 50+ in a Skill (Medicine; Tei'serin's CS) ... 5
Reach 50+ in a Skill (Teaching; Tei'serin's CS) ... 5
September Top Votes: at 200 votes ... 3
October Top Votes: at 300 votes ... 5
Event • [Contest] Welcome To The Game Voting (here) ... 2
Event Participation and Completion (Global Event 717) (here) ... 2
Finish Collaborative Thread with 2+ PCs (not including your PC) (here) ... 5
Meet An Immortal or Mortal Born: Ziell ... 2
November Top Votes: at 200 votes ... 3
December Top Votes: at 200 votes ... 3
Event Participation and Completion (Global Event 717) (here) ... 2
Finish Collaborative Thread with 2+ PCs (not including your PC) (here) ... 5
Earned a medal (One Arc Later) ... 5
Earned a medal (Painting With Words) ... 5
Earned a medal (Event Medal; Labyrinth - Global Event 717) ... 5
Earned a medal ("...ow.") ... 5
Earned a medal (Pioneer; For participating in the Emean Labyrinth in the Global Event 717) ... 5
January Top Votes: at 300 votes ... 5
February Top Votes: at 300 votes ... 5
Event Participation and Completion ([Post-Global] Begging Forgiveness) ... 2
Finish Collaborative Thread with 2+ PCs (not including your PC) ([Post-Global] Begging Forgiveness) ... 5
March Top Votes: at 350 votes ... 6
April Top Votes: at 300 votes ... 5
May Top Votes: at 300 votes ... 5
Create an approved song (here), worth double because of this) ... 6
*June Top Votes: at 300 votes ... 5
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Total Points: 276

* means they have yet to be submitted for approval, and are just being recorded so I don't forget to submit them
User avatar
Tei'serin Nji'ryn
Approved Character
 
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2016 11:25 pm
Race: Sev'ryn
Profession: Herbalist and Teacher
Renown: +153
Character Sheet
Prophets' Notes
Plot Notes
Personal Journal
Templates
Medals: 14
Painting With Words (1) One Arc Later... (1) Pioneer (2) ...ow. (1)
First Kiss (1) Immortal Lover (1) Legend In Waiting (1) Vhalar 716 (1)
Holiday Event 2016 (1) Cylus 717 Thread Challenge (1) Cylus 717 PC/Dev Challenge (1) Cylus 717 All Star (1)
Event Medal (1)

Tei'serin's Plotnotes

Postby Tei'serin Nji'ryn » Thu Feb 02, 2017 10:26 pm

Tei'serin Nji'ryn


Goals



OOC Goals


1. Complete the Cylus 717 Writing Challenge in full (done)
2. Get completely caught up in threads.
3. Earn enough point bank points to be able to afford 2 Aging Elixirs (143/200 pts earned)
4. Earn enough point bank points to be able to afford a Hyx (0/500 pts earned)
5. Earn the Immortal Lover medal. (done)
6. Earn the Start a Family medal.
7. Earn the Legend in Waiting medal. (done)
8. Write up some locations in Treth; a school house, a book shop, a general store, etc. (school and general store done here, tavern done here)
9. Write up some NPCs in Treth for any locations I submit. (owner of general store, tavern employees, and Tedrik done)



Short Term Goals


1. Get Tei'serin's Medicine and Teaching skills up to expert level. (done)
2. Earn Conversational Xanthea for Tei'serin. (done)
3. Work on giving Tei'serin the following skills: Animal Husbandry, Agriculture, Baking, Business Management, Candlemaking, Cooking, Drawing, Field Craft, Fishing, Gardening, Mount, and Sewing.
4. Earn Broken (and later Conversational) Rakahi for Tei'serin.
5. Work on seeing how the relationship between Tei'serin and Brynjar develops.


Long Term Goals


1. Earn Legendary in Medicine and Teaching.
2. Get 2nd level (and 3rd?) Sevrath for Tei'serin.
3. Have Tei'serin go to Desnind on a quest to find her familiar.
4. Have Tei'serin learn that her mother is alive, and meet her younger sibs.
5. Free Tei'serin from Thorin's control (likely through his death).
User avatar
Tei'serin Nji'ryn
Approved Character
 
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2016 11:25 pm
Race: Sev'ryn
Profession: Herbalist and Teacher
Renown: +153
Character Sheet
Prophets' Notes
Plot Notes
Personal Journal
Templates
Medals: 14
Painting With Words (1) One Arc Later... (1) Pioneer (2) ...ow. (1)
First Kiss (1) Immortal Lover (1) Legend In Waiting (1) Vhalar 716 (1)
Holiday Event 2016 (1) Cylus 717 Thread Challenge (1) Cylus 717 PC/Dev Challenge (1) Cylus 717 All Star (1)
Event Medal (1)

Tei'serin's Plotnotes

Postby Tei'serin Nji'ryn » Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:32 pm

Tei'serin Nji'ryn


Cylus 717 Writing Challenge



A. Thread Challenges

1. Write a thread that includes a door, a candle, and a bird.
2. Give a gift to another PC in-thread.
3. Have your PC tell a story from their childhood to a PC or NPC.
4. Get into a fight (verbal or physical) with another PC.
5. Write a thread that includes a necklace, a dagger, and a tree.
6. Have your PC fail at a flirtation.
7. Start a post with the line, “The smell reminds me of home.”
8. Write a thread that references an Immortal.
9. End a post with the line, “And that’s how I lost my pants.”
10. Write a thread that includes snow (or rain), a mouse, and a bard.

Flights of Fancy

Includes all 10 challenges.


B. Character Challenges

1. Increase a skill from 0 to 15.

Tei'serin's CS - added Mount

2. Earn 5 knowledge in a single skill.

[Treth] Four Legged Friends

3. Identify your PC’s goal (seasonal or overarching) and share it in the plot development forum, the personal journal forum, or in your city’s OOC Social Thread.

Tei'serin's Journal

4. Update your thread list on your CS to include all current and past threads.

Edited to include my first thread for Cylus 717

Tei'serin's CS

5. Create a vlog or write a personal journal entry talking about your PC.

Tei'serin's Journal


C. Development Challenges

1. Submit a slang term or phrase to a city’s development thread.

here

2. Submit a folktale to a city’s development thread.

The Lucky Seed


3. Submit a holiday, ritual, or tradition to a city’s development thread.

Greeting the Sun

4. Write a thoughtful review in the player feedback forum.

here

5. Welcome a new player on the “Welcoming Floor!” forum.

here
User avatar
Tei'serin Nji'ryn
Approved Character
 
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2016 11:25 pm
Race: Sev'ryn
Profession: Herbalist and Teacher
Renown: +153
Character Sheet
Prophets' Notes
Plot Notes
Personal Journal
Templates
Medals: 14
Painting With Words (1) One Arc Later... (1) Pioneer (2) ...ow. (1)
First Kiss (1) Immortal Lover (1) Legend In Waiting (1) Vhalar 716 (1)
Holiday Event 2016 (1) Cylus 717 Thread Challenge (1) Cylus 717 PC/Dev Challenge (1) Cylus 717 All Star (1)
Event Medal (1)

Tei'serin's Plotnotes

Postby Tei'serin Nji'ryn » Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:35 pm

Tei'serin Nji'ryn


Herbal Remedies



Remedies



Teas


Teas are warm, and soothing to drink. That alone can give some comfort to someone who is ill. They are also easy to use because the dried herbs used to make them are easy to store, and the potency of dried herbs can last for arcs in many cases. Since one dried herb can look very much like another, it is very important to label them correctly.

Teas are made by pouring boiling water over the dried herb being used, and allowing it to steep for twenty bits before straining the liquid and giving it to the patient.


Infusions



Infusions are stronger than normal teas because they use more herbs, and are steeped for longer amounts of time. They are made by putting two ounces of fresh herbs, or two generous handfuls of dried herbs into a glass jar, and pouring a pint of water over them. The herbs must be completely covered by the water. The water and herbs are then left to steep overnight. In a pinch, they can be allowed to steep for less time than that, but they must be allowed to steep for at least four breaks for the infusion to be effective, and longer is better. Ten breaks, or overnight is ideal. The mixture must then be strained, using a strainer or a cheesecloth.

When larger quantities of an infusion is needed, you can use a cup of dried herbs in a quart of water. This must be left to steep over night. Individual portions can then be heated for use as needed.


Decoctions



A decoction, (essentially a long, slow simmer) will extract the medicinal properties of the root into a flavorful, dark tea, which can be sipped purely, or mixed into any variety of tea-lattes or broths.

To make a decoction, simply add a handful of the desired root or herb to several cups of water and, bring it to a boil. Then reduce the heat to a gentle simmer, and allow to reduce for at least thirty bits; though five to six breaks is preferable since the longer the herbs/roots simmer, the stronger, and more beneficial the decoction will be


Infused Oils


With a wooden mallet, bruise fresh herbs, and stuff them into a 500mL mason jar. Then cover them with oil (light olive, almond or jojoba), and let it sit for 2 trials. Strain the oil (and repeat the above steps again for a stronger fragrance if desired), then store the oil in a dark glass jar.


Syrups



Syrups have the advantage of tasting better than other remedies. This makes it easier to convince children to take them. they also help to soothe coughs and sore throats. When making a syrup, it is best to use powdered herbs to avoid the necessity of straining the mixture. It is best to always use local honey when making a syrup. And honey should never be given to a child who is under one arc old.

To make a herbal honey, put one cup of honey and 1/4 cup of dried powdered herbs into a sterilized, dry jar, and place it into a double boiler over low heat. Heat the mixture for 15-20 bits while making sure not to let the honey boil or scorch. Stir the mixture, then remove it from the heat, and allow it to cool. When it is completely cooled, seal the syrup, and store it. The honey can be used immediately, but for a stronger honey, leave plant material in honey for two weeks before using.

Making a syrup is slightly different than making an herbal honey. You would start with an herbal decoction or infusion that has been reduced to about 1/2 to 1/4 of the original amount. So if you usually steep 15 grams of herbs in 1 quart of water for 20 bits, you would infuse the same amount of herbs in 1 cup of water for the same amount of time. Strain the tea well after steeping it. Three times as much honey is used to make the syrup in comparison to the amount of infusion used. So if you are using one cup of the infusion, it would be combined with three cups of honey.

This mixture gets placed into a double boiler. Heat it gently, avoiding a simmer or boil. While it is being heated, stir the honey into the tea until it is completely incorporated. Once this is done, divide the syrup into smaller portions, and store it in sterilized jars. At this point, you can add a tincture if desired. Cap the jar, and shake it to infuse the added medicine if a tincture is added.

Since syrups must be kept cool, it is difficult to store them during the warmer seasons. It can be done if you have a root cellar, but if you don't, make small batches that can be used immediately. In Zi'da, and Cylus, it is far easier to keep the syrups cool, so larger batches can be made as needed.


Steam Inhalation



Steam transports herbal medicine into the nose and throat. It can be used when a patient has difficulty swallowing for any reason, or if they cannot be convinced to drink a tea or infusion. Use extreme care not to burn your face, especially with the first rush of hot steam.

When using steam, place a generous handful of the desired herbs into a large heat proof glass or ceramic bowl. Then pour four cups of boiling water over the herbs. Have the patient hold their face high over the bowl to avoid getting burned by the steam as they breathe deeply. A towel is placed over their head to concentrate the steam. The patient should inhale the steam for at least ten bits.


Creams and lotions are water based topicals with varying amounts of fat – lotions having very little, creams more. Salves, balms and ointments are oil based with little, if any water. They can hold their shape outside the container but may “melt” on contact with body heat. The levels of wax, lard or petroleum determine how solid the material is.

An herbal infusion is basically a batch of herbal tea. In typical infusions, an ounce of dry herb is covered with a quart of boiling water and allowed to steep for up to 10 hours. The mixture is then strained and the liquid refrigerated and used as a beverage. Infusions made from alfalfa, peppermint or fenugreek can be used to flavor water or feeds for horses.

An herbal tincture is an extract made using apple cider vinegar or 80 proof alcohol. Measurements are usually not precise by weight. A small (e.g. pint) jar is filled halfway with herb and then with alcohol or vinegar. The herbs may be moistened first with boiling water. This sits for several weeks and when ready will keep for a few months. Amounts used are teaspoon or tablespoon.

To make an herbal poultice, dried herb is mixed with warm water to form a paste then applied. Fresh herbs are chopped then ground in a mortar with a pestle until the fluid is released and a pasty texture achieved. The herbs are covered with a layer of cheesecloth or linen. This is held in place with plastic wrap.


Dosages



Dosages vary by herb, condition, and the constitution of the patient. In general, for acute conditions, small amounts should be taken frequently. For chronic conditions, dosages are larger, but are taken less frequently while still on a consistent basis.

Adults – Acute illness guidelines:

Syrups and honey – ½ to 1 teaspoon every 2 breaks for a total of up to 10 teaspoons per trial
Tea – ¼ cup of tea every half a break for a total of up to 4 cups per trial


Adult – Chronic illness guidelines:

Syrups and honey – 1 to 2 tablespoons twice per trial, or as needed
Tea – 3 to 4 cups a trial

Since children are smaller than adults, they require smaller dosages. But the same rule of thumb regarding acute and chronic illnesses applies.

If an adult dose is one cup, then a child under two arcs should be given ½ to 1 teaspoon. A child who is 2-4 arcs would get 2 teaspoons. One who is 4-7 should be given 1 tablespoon. And a child of 7-11 arcs would get 2 tablespoons.

If an adult dose is one teaspoon or 60 drops, then a child of 1-1 1/2 arcs should be given 7 drops. A child who is 1 1/2-2 arcs would get 8 drops. One who is 2-3 should be given 10 drops. A 3-4 arc old child should get 12 drops. One who is 4-6 arcs would get 15 drops. A 6-9 arc old would get 24 drops. And a child of 9-12 arcs would get 30 drops.


Useful Tips


-Lemon juice squeezed into your sage tea removes the bitterness.

-Sweeten your tea with sugar or honey for respiratory problems, but leave it unsweetened for digestive upset.

-Make lavender talc: mix together 8 parts each bentonite clay & arrowroot powder, 1 part each slippery elm & comfrey root powder. Shake well. Add 30-50 drops lavender essential oil, shake again.

-Make homemade lavender scented candles, by adding fresh or dried lavender buds and a few drops of lavender essential oil into the heated wax.

-For a lovely salad dressing, whisk together 6 Tbsp olive oil, 2 Tbsp balsamic or apple cider vinegar, 1 Tbsp lemon juice, 1 crushed garlic clove, 2 Tbsp honey, 1 tsp each mustard powder & organic dried lavender flowers.

-Use organic lavender blooms as a garnish to add beautiful a purple hue to your cooking.

-Have a relaxing bath with your homemade lavender bath salt: Mix together 1 cup Epsom salt, ½ cup sea salt, 1/4 cup baking soda & 10-20 drops lavender essential oil. Mix well & store in a sealed jar. Use 1/3 cup per bath.

-Lavender Coconut Sugar Scrub: Mix together 1 cup white sugar, ½ cup melted coconut oil, 10-15 drops lavender essential oil, 2 Tbsp organic dried lavender buds. Store in a pretty glass jar.

-Add a few drops of food grade lavender oil to your homemade lemonade recipe.

-Add organic lavender blooms to your homemade jam for a nice & fragrant variation.

-Place fresh lavender flowers in closets and any other storage space to deter moths & silverfish.

-Add 2-3 drops of lavender essential oil to your natural deodorant for a natural floral lavender scent.

-Add 10-15 drops lavender essential oil to 40oz of carrier oil (sweet almond, or jojoba) for your own relaxing & calming massage oil.

-Make a Soothing Lavender Salve: slowly heat ½ cup olive oil over low heat. Add ¼ cup organic lavender buds, turn off heat and let cool 20 mins. Strain into a glass measuring cup. Boil an inch of water in a pot, simmer & place cup in water. To the cup, add 2 Tbsp grated beeswax, 10 drops lavender essential oil. Let simmer, stirring until all is melted. Pour into a dark glass jar, cool, seal & store.

-Add this Lavender Vanilla Syrup to champagne, vanilla ice cream, or over mixed summer berries: Simmer 1 cup water & ½ cup raw sugar over medium heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Add 2 tsp pure vanilla extract & 2 Tbsp organic dried lavender blooms, and simmer 20 mins. Remove from heat, let cool, place in fridge overnight. Strain blooms and store syrup in fridge for up to 3 months.

-Chamomile tea recipe:
Step 1

Boil 8 ounces of water for each cup of tea that you want to make.
Step 2

Measure 2 tablespoons of dried chamomile flowers or 4 tablespoons of fresh chamomile flowers, for each 8 ounces of water that you boiled. When measuring the flowers, whether dried or fresh, pack the measuring spoon tightly. Decrease or increase the ratio of chamomile flowers to water, for a weaker or stronger tea.

Step 3

Remove the pot of water from the heat, once the water starts rapidly boiling. Pour the water into a teapot and then place or stir the chamomile flowers in the water. Place a lid on the pot and let the chamomile flowers steep in the water for five minutes. You can decrease or increase the steeping time for a weaker or stronger tea.
Step 4

Place a small sieve on top of a cup.
Step 5

Pour the chamomile tea through the sieve into the cup. The sieve catches the chamomile flowers but lets the tea through.
Things You'll Need

Saucepan
Measuring cup
Measuring spoons
Dried or fresh chamomile flowers
Small sieve
Drinking glass
User avatar
Tei'serin Nji'ryn
Approved Character
 
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2016 11:25 pm
Race: Sev'ryn
Profession: Herbalist and Teacher
Renown: +153
Character Sheet
Prophets' Notes
Plot Notes
Personal Journal
Templates
Medals: 14
Painting With Words (1) One Arc Later... (1) Pioneer (2) ...ow. (1)
First Kiss (1) Immortal Lover (1) Legend In Waiting (1) Vhalar 716 (1)
Holiday Event 2016 (1) Cylus 717 Thread Challenge (1) Cylus 717 PC/Dev Challenge (1) Cylus 717 All Star (1)
Event Medal (1)

Tei'serin's Plotnotes

Postby Tei'serin Nji'ryn » Fri Feb 17, 2017 6:49 pm

Tei'serin Nji'ryn


Herbal Remedies



Herbs



Cold and Flu Remedies



Peppermint: It is possibly the most well known variety of mint. It is a hearty herb that gives off a minty smell when you rub its leaves. When dried, the leaves can be made into a tea, but it can also be used fresh when cooking. Both forms are good for soothing an upset stomach, freshening breath, and relieving cold symptoms. As a tea, it can promote sweating, which can help modulate fever. And as an essential oil, rubbing a few drops on a patient's temple will ease the pain of a headache. Peppermint has a cooling sensation when applied topically, so it can be used to help with minor aches and pain.

Lemon Balm: Lemon balm a type of mint that can be used to treat colds, the flu, and insomnia. It can also be used to ease some allergies. Lemon balm has a calming effect and therefore may be able to help remove fatigue, exhaustion, dizziness, anxiety, nervousness, and tension. When used in cooking, it can be used as a garnish for drinks and tangy dishes to add a delicate lemon flavor. It is especially good when used with fish.

Water Mint: Water mint is a strongly scented herb that smells similar to peppermint. It requires a lot of moisture in order to thrive, and is known for its sphere shaped lavender flowers. Water mint leaves can be dried and used in teas that will help with digestive problems, fevers, and headaches. It can also be used as a gargle to ease sore throats. When fresh, it can be used in salads.

Wild Mint: Wild mint is also known as field mint, or corn mint. It can be found growing in gardens, along streams, ditches, and riverbanks, as well as in fields and meadows. It is a useful plant that can be used to help repel rodents, and insects. Dried or fresh, the leaves can be used in herbal teas, and a variety of foods. This herb can be used to treat a number of conditions, including fevers, flu, pneumonia, headaches, heart issues, colds, and diarrhea.


Catnip, or catmint is particularly appealing to cats, who love to roll in its leaves. Under the influence of catnip, cats will often act as though they are drunk, something that many cat owners find amusing to watch. It can be used as either a tea, or a salve to treat a variety of conditions such as dandruff, hemorrhoids, fever, headaches, diarrhea, insect bites, and anxiety. It can also be used as a cold and flu remedy. Its sedative influence on the nerves adds to its soothing quality. Catnip combines well with the pleasant taste of mint and sage for a pleasant herbal remedy for fever.


Ginger: Fresh ginger root can be grated or chopped very finely, and made into a tea that is very good to help with sore throats. Ginger tea has a warming quality, so it is good to give someone who is suffering from the effects of the cold. It is also a good expectorant (allowing people to cough up mucus more easily), and it could be used to fight inflammation and pain when in powdered form. Ginger is very good for both nausea and vomiting. Powdered ginger doesn't need to be fresh to be made into a tea, so it is easier to keep on hand than ginger root is. Unfortunately, since it is so spicy, it has to be diluted for children. It can, however be flavored with lemon or honey to improve the flavor.

Echinacea: Echinacea is a good preventative. It does little to treat the symptoms of a cold, but it does make the body stronger, allowing someone to fight off a cold more easily. Putting thirty drops of echinacea tincture in a cup of water and gargling with it iss known to shorten the length of a cold. It can also be drunk in tea form as needed. And if someone begins drinking echinacea tea as soon as they were exposed to someone who had a cold, or the flu, it is possible that they might not even get sick at all.

Astragalus: Astragalus is another preventative. When taken as soon as someone is exposed to a person suffering from a cold or flu, it may stave off the illness entirely. Even if not, it will shorten the duration of the illness by strengthening a person's ability to fight illness. It has the added benefit of being able to increase blood flow to an area when applied to the skin, and as a result, speeding healing.

Elder Flower/Elderberry: Elder flower can be used both as a preventative to strengthen the body and shorten the duration of a cold, and to treat the symptoms of a cold, or flu (the berries tend to be more effective against the flu than the flowers), especially a runny nose. It can be used to treat asthma, and some allergies as well. It is good for lowering fevers. And it can be used to cause the body to sweat our liquids and eliminate metabolic waste. Used topically, it can reduce pain and swelling in joints due to some forms of arthritis and it can also be used to stop bleeding. As a gargle or mouthwash, it can help relieve the pain of a toothache. It can also be used as a laxative to help with constipation. The tea also has a calming effect, so it can be used to help reduce stress. It is a gentle herb, so it is safe to be given to children. And since both the flowers, and the berries have a sweet flavor, it is often a preferred remedy for the ailments it can treat.

Licorice Root: Licorice root is a good preventative, used to strengthen the body and shorten the duration of a cold. But also eases congestion and coughing by helping to loosen and thin mucus in airways. It can also help with sore throats. This herb is good for healing ulcers. It can lower stomach acid levels, relieve heartburn and indigestion and acts as a mild laxative. Licorice root is helpful in relieving fevers and soothing pain such as headaches. It can also ease the irritability, bloating and breast tenderness that women suffer during their monthly cycle.

Garlic: Garlic is an expectorant, so it helps a patient cough up mucus while it strengthened their body's ability to fight off the illness that afflicted it. It is also able to reduce the number of colds a person gets when taken regularly. Since it is a food as well as a medicinal herb, it has the benefit of being easy to convince people to take. Many already eat it as a normal part of their diet, so telling them to eat more isn't a hardship for them.

Stinging nettle: As a tea, stinging nettle will help cure mucus congestion, skin irritations, water retention, and diarrhea. It can also help nursing mothers produce milk. And it is good for digestion because it stimulates the digestive glands of the stomach, intestines, liver, pancreas, and gall bladder. When applied externally, it can relieve rheumatism in both people and animals. It makes a good gargle for mouth and throat infections. And it helps to clear up acne and eczema and promotes the healing of burns if used as a salve. Nettle juice will even ease the stinging of the rash brought about by contact with the plant's own bristled leaves. And if you simmer a handful of young nettles for two breaks in a quart of water, then strain, and bottle the liquid, you'll have a potion that will make hair soft and glossy when used regularly as a scalp conditioner.

Ginsing: Ginsing is capable of both reducing the severity of cold symptoms as well as shortening the length of a cold.

Ephedra: Ephedra can be used to treat bronchial asthma cold and flu, chills, lack of perspiration, headache, nasal congestion, aching joints and bones, cough and wheezing, and edema. It clears up respiratory congestion, and relaxes the airways. But it also stimulates the heart. Large doses of the herb can raise blood pressure. It can also cause palpitations, nervousness, insomnia, nausea, flushing, and headaches. Due to this, it should not be given to a patient with a weak heart, and when it is used, the patient should be carefully monitored to see if any complications arise.

Eucalyptus: As an essential oil, eucalyptus has a wide variety of uses. It is effective for treating a number of respiratory problems including colds, coughs, runny noses, sore throats, asthma, nasal congestion, bronchitis, and sinus problems. It is especially good for asthma. Massaging a few drops of essential oil onto the patient's chest, and the soothing effect of the aroma and vapors will calm the throat and dilate the blood vessels. This will allow more air into the lungs and make breathing easier. Eucalyptus can also be used for healing wounds, ulcers, burns, cuts, abrasions and sores. As a salve, is also good for insect bites and stings. In addition to soothing the affected area, it also protects the open wound or irritated area from developing infections from exposure to the air. Eucalyptus oil has a a cooling and refreshing effect. It is a stimulant, so it removes exhaustion and mental sluggishness as well as rejuvenating the spirits of those who are sick. It can also help to relieve stress. Massaging eucalyptus oil on the surface of the skin in a circular motion will help to relieve joint and muscle pain and stress. Eucalyptus essential oil is also very effective against cavities, dental plaque, gingivitis and other dental infections. The herb has qualities that makes it a bug repellent. It can also be used as a treatment for getting rid of lice. When used topically, it is good for treating skin infections, and increasing blood circulation. Eucalyptus oil is also used for treating fevers, and reducing body temperature. Another common name for it is “fever oil” for this reason. It works especially well when combined with peppermint oil, and sprayed on the patient's body as a mixture of a deodorant and a temperature reducer. It makes a good room freshener, especially in a medical clinic or hospital because it kills germs that can cause dangerous infections. Eucalyptus oil has a pleasant aroma, so it is often used in soaps.

Sage: Sage can be used for sore throats, coughs, fevers, and sinus congestion. As a gargle, it is good for gingivitis and sore gums. When used topically, it can help to eliminate body odor, and ease muscle aches, as well as the itch of insect bites. Pregnant women and nursing mothers should not use this herb because it can dry up their milk. But when it comes time to wean a child, even this can be a benefit as it helps to deal with the ache of breasts when they are full of milk. Older women can use it to help with relieving hot flashes, and women with heavy menstrual cycles can use it to slow heavy menstrual bleeding.

Hyssop: Hyssop’s fragrant flowers and leaves are used to relieve chest congestion, and coughs, as well as to soothe sore throats. They also act as a mild sedative. They are good for relieving gas and intestinal cramping. When used topically, it can soothe burned skin.

Lavender: Lavender is an herb that has a wide variety of uses. And it can be used in many different ways, including teas, infusions, essential oil, tinctures, salves, and muscle rubs. Its scent has a very calming quality. When diffused, it can calm coughs and colds; it is also an expectorant, so it can aid in coughing up mucus. It can also be used as a treatment for flatulence, colic, insomnia, nervous stomach, anxiety, depressive headaches, and the migraines that women get in menopause. The herb is good for relaxation, relieving stress, and is thought to be an aphrodisiac. It can promote restful sleep (as an essential oil, tincture, or dried and added to pillows), and is often used as a sleep aid for that reason. As a dried herb (using the flower heads), it can be used to make a relaxing herbal tea (often mixed with chamomile, and/or oat straw) by steeping it in hot (not boiling water) for a few minutes and adding honey. The essential oil has even more uses. Adding a few drops of the essential oil, or a cup of strong brewed tea, and a cup of epsom salts to a bath will help relax sore muscles and aching joints. It can sooth sunburns and other burns if a few drops of the essential oil are added to a bottle of cool water and rubbed onto the burns to offer relief; the same effect can be achieved if the dried herb is brewed into a strong tea and rubbed on instead. Smelling lavender and peppermint oils or rubbing into into the temples often helps to relieve headaches. The essential oil can be used topically to help with acne and skin irritations. A few drops of lavender essential oil put into a warm foot bath will help to ease your child into a peaceful sleep (this also helps them pee before they go to sleep, so they won't wake up as often at night). Lavender infused oil also helps with dry, itchy skin; it is especially good for children. A few drops of lavender essential oil rubbed into the skin can help soothe bug bites. Sprinkle lavender essential oil on your pillow at night for a peaceful night’s sleep; this is even safe for babies and toddlers. Adding a few drops of lavender essential oil to a carrier oil (light olive, sweet almond, jojoba, etc.) and massaging it over the lower abdomen will help relieve menstrual cramps. Lavender water (made by adding 5 drops of lavender essential oil for every 5oz of water) makes a refreshing facial tonic. Lavender has many non medical uses as well. Its pleasant scent makes it great for making soaps, candles, perfumes, lotions, and massage oils. Simmering dried lavender herb in a pot of water with some citrus peels makes a wonderful air freshener. Pouches of dried lavender can be used to freshen rooms, and clothes. The dried flowers can be infused into vinegars for use in cooking or as a skin toner (when diluted). A strong tea can be cooled and used as a scalp rinse to remedy dandruff. Crushing fresh flowers and spreading the pulp on your arms and legs will help repel flies and mosquitoes. Finally, lavender is edible. The flowers can be added to salads. The herb can also be used in baking, and added as a seasoning to dressings, and vinegars.

Feverfew: Feverfew can be used to treat coughs and colds, arthritis, asthma, constipation, earache, fever, headache, inflammatory conditions, insect bites, labor, menstrual disorders, potential miscarriage, spasms, stomachache, swelling, tinnitus, toothache, vertigo, and worms. It is also known to prevent migraine headaches and the nausea and vomiting that comes with them. Feverfew can be used as an insecticide. Due to its potential anti clotting actions, it is not recommended for use in patients undergoing surgery. Pregnant women should not use it because the leaves stimulate menstruation and may induce abortion. It is not recommended for breast-feeding mothers or for use in children younger than 2 arcs old. Handling fresh feverfew leaves may cause allergic skin reactions. Possible side effects include swelling of the lips, tongue, and lining of the mouth, as well as mouth ulcers. Effects such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, indigestion, and gas, may also occur.

Yarrow: Yarrow is a common weed that grows freely in grassland, chalk land, roadsides, and other sites with well draining ground. It is instantly recognizable due to its feathery leaves, strong stems and broad white flower heads made up of many small individual flowers. Yarrow is helpful in relieving fevers, shortening the duration of cold and flu, helping improve relaxation during illness, and relieving cramps associated with growing pains, or illness. It has the added benefit of being safe for children. Applied topically, it is helpful with skin itching, rash or other issues. As a salve, it staunches bleeding, and is also known for its pain relieving ability. Drinking hot teas of yarrow can help break a fever by relaxing the circulation and the pores of the skin, allowing us to sweat freely and ridding the body of infection. An especially good tea for colds and flus is made up of yarrow, peppermint, and elder flower; it should be drunk as a hot tea as soon as possible. The the patient should then wrap up warmly, keeping a hot water bottle at their feet and wait to sweat. When there is a high body temperature but no sweating, this formula is especially useful to help release the heat via the skin. Yarrow is also good for poor circulation because it gets the blood moving, and it is able to prevent blood clots. It is known for both stopping, and causing nosebleeds; to stop one, pick a few fresh leaves (they are available all arc-round, but are at their best in Ashan and Vhalar) and rub them between your hands to bruise them, releasing the aromatic oil. Then roll the leaves into a nasal plug, insert it into the affected nostril and leave it in until the bleeding completely stops before gently removing the plug. Yarrow is a bitter, aromatic, pungent herb, and that makes it good for digestion; it has a very bitter aftertaste. It can also be used to help with bloody diarrhea and dysentery. Yarrow tea can both staunch heavy bleeding and stimulate scanty bleeding. It is also useful when there is congestion resulting in dark clotted blood and menstrual pains. It is useful for vaginal infections and irregular discharge as well as spotting between periods. It can even help people who have problems with frequent urination. Preparations are usually made from the areal parts including leaf, flower and some stem, though it is best to leave out the toughest bits. They can then be used in a variety of ways: tea – take hot for colds and flus and warm or cool for cystitis. Or use as a wash for grazes or rashes, tincture – for chronic congestion in the reproductive system and high blood pressure (teas could also be used here), baths – for skin irritations, sitz baths – for cystitis, vaginal infections, bleeding fibroids, hemorrhoids, post-partum healing, heavy periods etc., foot baths – for chilblains, infused oil – for first aid healing ointments or soothing creams for irritated skins, a poultice or compress – spit poultices for wounds and first aid situations, compresses for larger areas of grazed skin, wound powder – finely powdered dried herb can be sprinkled on minor wounds, spray – the tincture or herb infused in witch hazel can be sprayed onto varicose veins to tone, and move stagnant blood, and essential oil – a wonderful anti-inflammatory for skin conditions. Chewing the fresh leaves can help to relieve toothaches. The young leaves and flowers of yarrow are used in salads. Some people will notice relief from allergy symptoms by drinking a tea of yarrow and mint. And an external tincture or poultice will often help with rashes and broken skin. Yarrow is good for closing bleeding wounds caused by weapons or tools made of iron; find a plant, strip the leaves, crush them and pack them into the wound. It won't introduce infection into the wound. Yarrow should not be given to pregnant women.

Mullein: Mullein is a woolly-leafed biennial plant. During its first arc of growth, the large leaves form a low-lying basal rosette. In the Ashan of its second arc, the plant develops a tall stem that can grow to more than 1.22 meters in height. The top portion of the stem develops yellow flowers that have a faint, honey-like odor. This, along with the stamens, constitutes the active ingredient. It can be used to treat asthma, colds, coughs, tuberculosis, and related respiratory problems. It is also good for treating hemorrhoids, burns, bruises, and gout. Mullein can be ingested, applied topically, and smoked. The yellow flowers can be used as a source of yellow hair dye. The boiled root can be administered for croup. The leaves can be applied topically to soften and protect the skin. And an oil derived from its flowers can be used to soothe earaches.

Marshmallow Root: Marshmallow leaf and root are used for pain and swelling (inflammation) of the mucous membranes that line the respiratory tract. They can also used for suppressing a dry cough, inflammation of the lining of the stomach, diarrhea, stomach ulcers, constipation, urinary tract inflammation, and stones in the urinary tract. Marshmallow leaf and root can be applied directly to the skin to treat abscesses, and skin ulcers, and as a poultice for skin inflammation or burns, and for other wounds. Marshmallow leaf is used topically as a poultice for insect bites. Marshmallow root can be applied to the skin as an ingredient in ointments for chapped skin as well as for pain and swelling of the feet and hands due to exposure to the cold (chilblains). Both marshmallow leaf and root are used as a flavoring agent.

Slippery Elm: Slippery elm is a tree. The branches are very rough, the leaves long, unequally toothed, rough with hairs on both sides, the leaf-buds covered with a dense yellow wool, and the flowers are stalkless. The inner bark (not the whole bark) is what is used in herbal remedies; it can be used to create balms or salves. It is collected in Ashan from the bole, and larger branches, and dried. The powdered bark is comes in two forms: a coarse powder that is used in poultices, and a fine powder used for making a mucilaginous drink. The powder should be either greyish, or fawncoloured; if it's dark or reddish, it won't work well. The disintegrated bark can be moistened to form a flexible and spongy tissue, which is easily molded into pessaries, teats, and suppositories. Slippery elm has a soothing and healing action on all the parts it comes in contact with. Taken orally, slippery elm can be used for coughs, sore throat, colic, diarrhea, constipation, hemorrhoids, irritable bowel syndrome, bladder and urinary tract infections, protecting against stomach ulcers, too much stomach acid, and for expelling tapeworms. When used externally, it can help heal wounds, burns, gout, rheumatism, cold sores, boils, abscesses, and be used as a lubricant to ease labor. Slippery Elm can be combined with the bark of wild cherry trees, the leaves of a sweetgum, and mullein to make a very effective cough syrup. Another good cough remedy is the following: cut at least an ounce of bark into pieces about the thickness of a match, then add a pinch of cayenne powder with a slice of lemon, and sweeten, infusing the whole in a pint of boiling water and letting it stand for 25 bits. Take this frequently in small doses. It can also help indigestion and heartburn when mixed with water and consumed. Slippery elm is also taken by mouth to cause an abortion. It is edible, and possesses as much nutrition as is contained in oatmeal. When made into a gruel, it forms a wholesome and sustaining food for infants and invalids. People who are so ill that they can tolerate no other food can stomach slippery elm gruel easily. It has a pleasant taste, tasting much like oatmeal; it can also be flavored with sugar, salt, cinnamon, etc. as desired.

Plantain: Plantain is a useful herb that is often considered a weed by most people. The plants don’t have any stems above the ground; all you see is a tuft of leaves coming from a point. The characteristic flower stalks help identify plantain among other rosette-forming plants, but they may not be present all the time. It grows just about everywhere; people often find it growing in their own yards. There are two types of plantains; ones that have broad leaves, and ones that have narrow leaves. Both can be used for healing purposes, but most herbalists seem to prefer the broad leaf plantain with larger, but softer, edible leaves. The leaves of the broad leafed plantain are actually edible and some what similar to spinach, though slightly more bitter. Tender leaves can be eaten fresh in salads, but older leaves have to be cooked. Plantain leaves can be made into both a tea or a tincture, that can help with indigestion, heartburn and ulcers when taken internally. Plantains also have an astringent property that has a cleansing effect on the body. It helps to dry up excess secretions in the respiratory tract, and the digestive system, which makes it useful in treating both colds and diarrhea. It is gentler than most astringints, so it is safe to use on children. When used externally as a salve or poultice, plantain is good for insect and snake bites, and as a remedy for rashes and cuts, and bruises. A tea, tincture, or salve made with plantain greatly eases the itch of poison ivy, oak, or sumac. Plantain salves are good for injuries because they are effective in stopping bleeding. It can also prevent infections, and accelerate healing.

Horehound: Horehound is a perennial, aromatic herb of the mint family. The plant has oval leaves covered with white, woolly hairs, and bears small, white flowers. The leaves and flower tops of the horehound can be used to make a bitter tea that is good for colds. It is a suppressant, and an expectorant, so it is also good for coughs. For an ordinary cold, a simple infusion of Horehound (Horehound Tea) is generally sufficient in itself. But for a severe cold, two or three teaspoons of the expressed juice of the herb may also be given. The tea may be made by pouring boiling water on the fresh or dried leaves, 1 OZ. of the herb to the pint. It is a gentle herb that can be given to children; in the form of syrup, it is a most useful medicine for children, not only for the complaints mentioned, but as a tonic and a corrective of the stomach. It has a pleasant taste, so children don't mind taking it. Taken in large doses, it acts as a gentle purgative (but it can cause irregular heartbeat when used in large quantities, so the patient should be monitored). The powdered leaves can be used as a vermifuge (serving to expel worms or other animal parasites from the intestines), and it is good for dysentery. The green leaves, bruised and boiled in lard, are made into an ointment which is good for wounds. As a wound cleanser, crush Horehound leaves, boil them in a pan of lard, let cool, and use as an ointment on the wound. It has non medical uses as well, and can be used as flavorings in liqueurs (such as Horehound Ale, an appetizing and healthful beverage), candies, and cough drops. Candied horehound is best made from the fresh plant by boiling it down until the juice is extracted, then adding sugar before boiling this again, until it has become thick enough in consistence to pour into a paper case and be cut into squares when cool.

Osha Root: Osha root is also known as loveage, loveroot, or bear medicine because bears take to nuzzling each other after chewing it for health reasons. It is very good for coughs, colds, and other respiratory ailments. Osha can also be taken when traveling to higher altitudes to promote easy breathing. Osha's seeds and leaves are also edible. Osha has a pleasant taste, similar to a peppery celery, or a bit like anise. Consuming it in any form has the side effect of making someone feel "cuddly."

Onion: Onions are great for coughs. Raw onions will keep the respiratory tract open. It has the added benefit of being readily available at all times since it is a food that most people already include in their diets.

Thyme: Thyme is a seasoning that is often used in cooking. But it is also great for colds. It eases sore throats and coughs when made into a tea. And it has the added benefit of strengthening the body so it is able to fight illnesses of faster, which in turn shortens the duration of a cold or cough. If you rub thyme leaves between your fingers, it will release an essential oil that makes a great repellent that will drive away mosquitoes. You can also make homemade repellent by mixing four drops of thyme oil to every teaspoon of olive oil, or mixing five drops for every 2 ounces of water. Thyme has a pleasant scent, so it is a popular ingredient in deodorants, and it is also often included in potpourri.

Cayenne powder: Cayenne powder is a stimulant, analgesic, and an expectorant. It can help prevent a cold or flu, as well as shorten their duration if you do come down with one. Cayenne powder brings heat to the body, which can help dispel coldness.

Honey – Honey has a wide variety of uses. As a sweetener, it is better for you than sugar, and it can be used to sweeten many of the more bitter herbal teas. People who need to lose weight can still enjoy sweet things if they substitute honey for sugar in their cooking. It is also the base of herbal honey, and is used as an ingredient in some of the syrups. But it also has medicinal uses in its own right. One of which is that it is very good for sore throats. And when mixed with lemon essential oil, and peppermint oil, it is even more effective. When mixed with ginger and lemon juice, it can help to relieve nausea. This makes it good for someone who has the flu. It is also good for helping with morning sickness. Honey promotes restorative sleep; adding a tablespoon of it to warm milk will create a nice sleep aid. If bought locally, raw honey can help reduce seasonal allergies. A tablespoon or two of honey will counteract indigestion. Raw honey can also strengthen the heart, and improve blood circulation. When used externally, raw honey can help speed up the healing time for mild burns, wounds, rashes, and abrasions. It can also help with acne; take half a teaspoon, warm it between your hands, and spread it on your face gently, then leave it on for 10 bits before rinsing with warm water, and pat dry. Honey makes a great exfoliator, too; use it on dry skin by adding two cups of honey to a bath, soak the affected area for 15 bits, then add one cup of baking soda before soaking for 15 bits more. A spoonful of raw honey mixed with olive oil, and a squeeze of lemon can be used as a hydrating lotion. Raw honey can also cleanse and restore the health of your hair and scalp when used as a shampoo.

Lemon – Lemons will help to decrease the strength of the cold and flu virus in the body, and reduce phlegm. Many folks use lemons to build resistance to cold and flu, and speed up healing. They will help with both fevers, and chills if you drink a cup of hot water mixed with some honey, and the juice of one lemon. If you add the juice of a lemon, and a teaspoon (5ml) of sea salt to a cup (250ml) of lukewarm water, and use the mixture as a gargle three times a trial, it will help to ease a sore throat. Lemons can also accelerate the healing process of canker sores if you mix the juice of a freshly squeezed lemon into a glass of lukewarm water, and rinse your mouth with this solution; this should be done three times a trial. There may be a burning sensation when the lemon juice comes into contact with the canker, but the more frequently you use it, the less burning there will be. Eating a lemon peel can reduce cramping and gas pains while it aids digestion; it increases circulation, stimulates urination, and strengthens the immune system. Lemons will help with bad breath if you rinse your mouth with lemon juice several times a trial, or chew a slice of lemon after every meal. Drinking the juice of a freshly squeezed lemon mixed into a glass of lukewarm water after each meal will aid in digestion. When used externally, lemons can help with acne; apply fresh lemon juice on acne, and leave it overnight. Then wash the area with water the following morning. There may be an uncomfortable sensation of burning at first, but it will soon disappear. Another method is to mix one part freshly squeezed lemon juice with an equal part of rose or honey water. Put the mixture on affected areas for at least half a break. Then wash it afterwards with water. This application should be repeated twice daily, ideally in the morning and the evening. Inhaling lemon oil can help increase concentration and alertness. Lemon poultices applied overnight are a good home remedy for corns and calluses. To make one, place a slice of lemon approx 5 mm thick on to the corn, then bandage it. Dabbing the affected area with lemon essential oil also helps accelerate the healing process. But take care to only use the undiluted oil on the callused area using a cotton ball, as it is too strong for un-callused skin. Lemon wraps can help with skin infection such as eczema; add 8 drops of lemon essential oil to one cup (250ml) lukewarm water, and one tablespoon (15ml) of liquid honey (honey also has anti-inflammatory effect and strengthens the healing power of lemon). Soak a linen cloth in the liquid, squeeze out the excess, and then gently place the cloth on the affected area for 15 bits, 2 to 3 times a trial; not only will this ease the infection, it will counter the overwhelming urge to scratch. Lemon juice will repel insects if you rub it on any skin that isn't covered by clothing before going outside. And lemons can help ease the sting a bug bite if you massage one or two drops of lemon oil mixed with a teaspoon of honey into the skin around the bite. Lemon oil can ease pain if you massage the affected area every trial with several drops of lemon oil mixed with 1 tablespoon (15ml) jojoba oil. Lemon juice can be used to stop a nose bleed if you apply it to cotton, and place it in the nostril.
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Postby Tei'serin Nji'ryn » Fri Feb 17, 2017 10:21 pm

Tei'serin Nji'ryn


Herbal Remedies



Cold and Flu Remedies
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